The Fastest Internet Providers in America - August, 2022

The Fastest Internet Providers in America - August, 2022

November 4, 2022 | Published: August 25, 2022

The new lifeblood of the economy is data, and future economic growth will depend on our ability to transfer that data quickly. Fiber-optic cables and 5G wireless transmitters rank as high as oil pipelines in their importance to our way of life, and having a high-speed internet connection is essential.

We ranked the fastest internet providers based on data from more than 28 million internet speed tests conducted in July.

The Fastest National Providers

The providers listed below all have a service area covering at least 100 million people, and have 90th percentile speeds of 150Mbps or higher.  AT&T had the highest speed recorded by a national provider at a BLAZING 4,424 Mbps download speed.

90th percentile (Mbps) Maximum speed (Mbps) Median (Mbps) Est. population Covered
Verizon 544 1835 130 305,552,896
AT&T 488 4424 62 306,461,488
Xfinity 442 1720 113 111,927,145
Spectrum 293 1018 99 102,726,027
T-Mobile 167 1166 24 288,319,911

The Fastest Local and Regional Providers

All of the providers below had speeds above 150Mbps or higher at the 90th percentile and have a service area spanning between 200,000 and 40 million people.  Stealth Communications, which is primarily a business internet provider, had the highest maximum speed recorded at an eye-popping 7,529 Mbps.

90th percentile (Mbps) Maximum speed (Mbps) Median (Mbps) Est. population Covered
Stealth Communications 4189 7529 28 2,110,129
Sonic 913 5708 143 1,696,048
Pilot 544 3744 150 673,979
Google Fiber 532 4091 140 2,848,858
US Signal Company 506 1683 78 2,013,697
UTOPIA 504 933 88 371,907
Frontier Communications 501 2376 95 33,047,632
netBlazr 500 928 174 543,758
SUMOFIBER 467 933 118 680,878
Ziply Fiber 464 2146 71 1,482,362
Ultimate Internet Access 445 947 71 523,958
Astound Broadband Powered by Grande 437 2650 117 1,419,741
EPB 432 4653 94 363,786
Connext 426 893 107 735,956
VTel Wireless 423 931 80 621,795
Cincinnati Bell 410 1548 79 1,518,281
Viser 405 920 45 381,108
OSHEAN 398 2423 65 966,614
FirstDigital Telecom 386 931 90 726,502
GVEC.net 383 943 67 665,876
C Spire Fiber 383 1380 24 1,608,230
Vast Networks 381 2175 65 1,962,960
Unite Private Networks 380 1993 93 4,638,480
Suddenlink Communications 369 1454 87 7,020,099
Astound Broadband Powered by Wave 368 1736 89 2,109,144
ACD.net 365 943 30 904,073
WOW! 362 1062 96 7,174,627
Single Digits 362 939 66 362,820
Crown Castle Fiber 353 4448 72 36,626,458
Breezeline 349 1088 98 1,897,822
Optimum by Altice 343 5319 114 11,941,064
Everywhere Wireless 335 930 102 3,916,796
Mediacom Cable 335 1266 77 6,564,176
Surf Broadband Solutions 327 945 65 1,038,470
Dakota Carrier Network 320 818 92 395,028
TDS Telecom 315 1144 69 2,048,611
Metronet 293 1500 29 5,122,649
Tekify Fiber & Wireless 285 948 38 470,364
SenaWave 282 930 89 455,224
LOGIX Fiber Networks 271 2249 93 358,941
Fidelity Communications 269 1117 57 385,492
GCI Communication 268 755 75 559,918
Armstrong 267 2161 99 1,063,965
Sparklight (formerly Cable One) 266 2372 83 4,292,287
Consolidated Communications (Formerly Fairpoint Communications) 239 3281 29 4,572,375
Towerstream 237 852 178 1,029,908
Ptera 237 919 10 614,356
Aerux Broadband 232 935 85 1,476,008
PenTeleData 231 3003 73 2,021,477
NexGen Communications 230 774 47 428,871
Net Vision Communications LLC 228 902 38 726,758
Northland Communications 227 902 89 363,894
Point Broadband 225 2048 70 604,099
Parker FiberNet 211 1756 49 473,196
Hawaiian Telcom 210 422 41 1,282,690
Cablelynx Broadband 208 942 53 376,970
Vyve Broadband 203 1211 83 1,295,573
Shentel 199 3099 46 417,577
Buckeye Broadband 194 2133 84 542,329
NUVISIONS 191 934 43 1,591,513
OnlineNW 187 941 13 505,449
Agile Networks 183 697 13 5,124,661
Uniti Fiber 181 945 63 660,652
TPx Communications 180 1549 42 638,808
WiLine Networks 174 2836 43 2,136,190
Nextera Communications 170 888 47 2,589,030
Cruzio Internet 160 944 42 3,024,653
Windstream 158 1298 27 12,660,437
KwiKom Communications 152 917 13 3,033

 
More on why we chose the 90th percentile:

First, the median speed unfairly favors certain providers depending on their customer base. Companies that offer internet packages at a variety of speeds, or leverage a variety of technologies, may have a lower median because a large number of customers may choose slower plans to match their budget. Providers that only offer one package, or that may only have commercial customers, will see a smaller impact on their median. The 90th percentile can also be affected by this, but it levels the playing field by focusing on customers who have bought high speed packages.

Second, the maximum observed speed is a poor indicator of the speeds people are actually experiencing – there is an extreme drop off in speeds below that. The following graph shows an example of this drop-off, where speeds are indicated on the X-axis and the Y-axis shows the percentage of customers experiencing that speed or higher.

Internet Speed Drop-off Graph

While this provider had observed speeds as high as 780 Mbps, that represented just one person in over 3000, or the top 0.03% of speeds observed.

Advertised speed vs. actual speed

The actual internet speed delivered to your home is often lower than the speed advertised on your internet provider’s plan. This is due to a number of factors, many of which are internet-type specific.

For example, cable internet users often have to deal with slower speeds during peak hours, since bandwidth is shared with neighbors. This is especially true in the evening hours when many households have an increased volume of internet use.

DSL internet speeds often vary depending on the proximity of your home to the provider’s local office in your area. For fixed wireless users, household items such as microwaves or objects obstructing the clear line-of-sight to/from your antenna can give you slower speeds.

A satellite internet connection also requires a line-of-sight connection with the network. This can cause slower speeds for users living in areas with mountains and forests. The equipment is also susceptible to interference from poor weather conditions.

Fiber internet providers are often able to deliver speeds extremely close to advertised speeds.

What speed do I need?

In 2015, then FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler introduced the current definition of broadband internet, which is 25 Mbps download and 3 Mbps upload speed (often denoted as 25/3). That definition may change, however, because on July 15th 2022, current FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel proposed increasing it to 100 Mbps down and 25 Mbps up (or 100/25), with an eye to going even higher in the future. In her proposal she stated, “The needs of internet users long ago surpassed the FCC’s 25/3 speed metric, especially during a global health pandemic that moved so much of life online […] The 25/3 metric isn’t just behind the times, it’s a harmful one because it masks the extent to which low-income neighborhoods and rural communities are being left behind and left offline.”

To get a better idea of exactly what speeds you need, you can refer to our bandwidth calculator that details the speeds required for a number of different activities.

Methodology

We queried M-Labs Network Diagnostic Tool (NDT) dataset for speed test data for 160 of the top internet providers in the US by estimated population covered. We analyzed over 28 million speed tests with over 1000 data points for each provider spanning a 12-month period.

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